Crestliner 1750 Pro Tiller: Video Boat Review

Our detailed review of this tiller-steered boat for the serious fisherman.

3rd October 2011.
By Charles Plueddeman

Read Charles’ Crestliner 1750 Pro Tiller Boat Test Notes

When I was a kid, you sat in the back of a fishing boat with your left hand on the motor. Steering wheels were for sissies. Today there are still some serious anglers who prefer the control and wide open deck that only a tiller steered boat like this Crestliner 1750 Pro Tiller can offer. It’s a traditional format but it’s not old school. Crestliner has kept its Pro Tiller line fresh and functional. Let’s check it out.

Performance

The 90 HP OptiMax outboard on our test boat is a two stroke and weighs less than a four stroke motor. That’s a great fit for this boat because you’ve already got the weight of the operator in the back so it improves performance. We had great cruising economy of 8.6 mpg at 19 mph, and a top speed of 40.4 mph.

Expert Interview

So Steve you’ve made some changes to the electronics locker on this boat. Can you show me how that works?

Steve Magers, Crestliner Boats: Well what we’ve changed is, this boat is used in rough water. So what we’ve done is stabilize the slide with a gas spring which is located here, to stabilize it when it’s out and also stabilizes when it’s in.

It looks like it’ll work a lot better than a thumb screw.

Steve: Yes it will.

So Steve, what kind of angler buys a tiller steered fishing boat?

Steve: This is for a serious fisherman that does a lot of trolling and wants a wide open cockpit.

Features

The focus of a tiller steered fishing boat is here in the cockpit. The angler wants to be able to control the outboard motor, watch his electronics, and have a rod over the side simultaneously. I think Crestliner’s done a good job of working that out.

Whoa, I got one!

So also with the layout, you’ve got rod straps here, a rod locker, a baitwell right under your right elbow, and for your lunkers, a twenty gallon live well that’s aerated with a timer.

The Mercury Big Tiller is designed specifically for use with these larger outboards. It’s got a robust arm that puts the key switch, gear shift, throttle and trim all close at hand.

So obviously the position of this seat is critical. So Crestliner ships this boat without installing the base. That way after you buy the boat you can put the seat wherever you want it.

Now here in the bow we’ve got lots of storage. A rod locker with ten tubes, another live well, a bait well, and a storage compartment here. This plastic liner has a raised lip that keeps this dry. These nets are great for rain gear and other stuff that can get wet.

Wrap Up

Now a tiller steer boat is not without its disadvantages. There’s no weather protection, and you can put more power on the same hull with remote steering. But if your presentation includes a lot of slow trolling, even back trolling, over structure, a tiller steer boat is the right tool for the job.

Charles Plueddeman


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About the author:

Charles Plueddeman

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Charles Plueddeman is Boats.com's outboard, trailer, and PWC expert. He is a former editor at Boating Magazine and contributor to many national publications since 1986.

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