Correct Craft Crossover 236 is Big

Correct Craft's 236 is a large crossover towboat and full of features aimed at buyers with families rather than hardcore watersports types—and it's right on target.

17th March 2008.
By Brett Becker

Larger than the average tow boat, the Correct Craft 236 was designed to attract family-oriented buyers.

Larger than the average tow boat, the Correct Craft 236 was designed to attract family-oriented buyers.

Taking a cue in the vernacular of the automotive industry—where else? —Correct Craft has introduced a new line of family-friendly boats called the Crossover line. Available in four lengths, each with a different beam, the Crossover models approach the tow boat market with an eye toward something more than either miniscule or monstrous wakes and stratospheric towers.

The 236 boasts a spacious open bow.

The 236 boasts a spacious open bow.

The largest model is the 236, which measures a few inches more than 25 feet in length and 100.5 inches abeam. If someone would have told you five years ago that a tow boat would be offered in such massive proportions, you probably would have said something like, “Yeah, right, and oil is going to top $100 a barrel.” And you would have been wrong on both counts.

This is just one of several easily accessible stowage lockers in the 236.

This is just one of several easily accessible stowage lockers in the 236.

More than just big, the 236 Crossover comes with some features not normally found on tow boats. For example, the walk-through beneath the windshield features a wind dam, which is great for blocking chilly air on cold mornings or curing cold-wet rides back to the docks. The 236 also comes with an innovative seat insert that fits between the ends of the rear U-shape lounges. It creates additional seating for two forward-facing passengers, yet puts them close enough to carry on a conversation with the driver and observer—ideal for “back-seat drivers.”

The 236 also comes with a pedestal-mounted dinette table that stows when not in use, and a walkway through the center of the sun pad, which features nonskid rubber matting with the Nautique “N” machined into the surface. Pretty trick. Naturally, there’s stowage beneath all seating areas and a low-maintenance fiberglass swim platform with rubber matting.

A walk-through section in the bench keeps people from having to step on upholstery as they head for the swim platform or reenter the cockpit.

A walk-through section in the bench keeps people from having to step on upholstery as they head for the swim platform or reenter the cockpit.

Power options range from the 5.7-liter 343-horsepower base engine to the 6.0-liter 390-horse ZR-6 from Pleasurecraft Marine. Other nifty features include a pop-up ski pylon, keyless ignition switch and control panel and an available tower, and ballast system with 791 pounds of capacity. Price for the 236 with the Limited package starts at a somewhat lofty $68,024, which is probably excusable because the boat is equally suitable for day-boating, regardless of whether a ski or board ever touches water. It’s a viable inboard alternative to a sterndrive Sea Ray, Maxum or even a Cobalt.

For more information, visit \ or call 800-346-2092.


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About the author:

Brett Becker

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Brett Becker is a freelance writer and photographer who has covered the marine industry for 15 years. In addition to covering the ski boat and runabout markets for Boats.com, he regularly writes and shoots for BoatTrader.com. Based in Ventura, Calif., Becker holds a bachelor’s degree in journalism and a master’s in mass communication from the University of Central Florida in Orlando.

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