Triumph 195 CC: Go Boating Review:

Triumph 195 CC: With Roplene rotomolded hull, this is one strong boat.

21st March 2006.
By Go Boating

Instead of the traditional fiberglass deck and hull clamshell that's bonded, bolted and screwed together, Triumph utilizes rotomolded technology to create its Roplene hulls, including that of the 195 Center Console.

Instead of the traditional fiberglass deck and hull clamshell that’s bonded, bolted and screwed together, Triumph utilizes rotomolded technology to create its Roplene hulls, including that of the 195 Center Console.

Triumph has been building quality offshore and bay boats for anglers for about 10 years now, and it has been getting more attention than ever since adopting a new hull construction technology.

Instead of the traditional fiberglass deck and hull clamshell that’s bonded, bolted and screwed together, Triumph utilizes rotomolded technology to create its Roplene hulls, including that of the 195 Center Console.

In essence, a plastic powder is poured into a large aluminum mold, which is heated to about 500 degrees. Then the entire mold is rotated and rocked by computer-controlled robotics allowing the powder to move inside the mold and melt in place to create a single solid-piece hull, deck and cockpit. The computer controls how long the powder is allowed to stay in a certain location, creating different thicknesses varying from .25 inch in low-stress areas to 1 inch in corners and other high-stress areas. Three hours later, the shell of a boat you could hang an engine on is complete. Once finished, the hollow interior of the shell is filled with foam.

There are a number of differences between a Roplene hull and a fiberglass hull. First, fiberglass itself will sink in water, Roplene will float. Roplene is also said to have up to five times the impact strength of fiberglass. There are no layers, matting or gelcoats involved with Roplene, so if you scratch it you just sand it or razor off the furled edge of the ding — no expensive patching or repair is necessary. Roplene also has a measure of give to it, so it will absorb some of the energy produced from pounding through chop, which makes for a softer and quieter ride. Triumph maintains that this allows it to get away with less deadrise and still have the same ride — and a smaller deadrise angle can give you a boost in fuel economy.

Performance

Our test of the 195 CC took place out on a bumpy San Francisco Bay. We had two people aboard and about a half tank of fuel (30 gallons or 188 pounds). For power we had a Yamaha F150 spinning a 14.5-inch, 3-blade aluminum prop.

With the throttle all the way forward and the engine trimmed up as far as conditions would allow we were able to post a peak speed of 47.7 mph at 6,000 rpm, which is right at the top end of the Yamaha F150′s rpm limit. The noise level was a touch loud at a top speed at 92 dBa, and you can expect a top-speed range of about 159 miles. Our most efficient cruising speed was 24.5 mph at 3,500 rpm, which yielded a whopping 315 miles of range. The sound level was noticeably quieter with 81 dBa at cruising speed.

Acceleration was quick with 3.4 seconds to plane and a 0 to 30-mph time of 8.1 seconds.

The 195 was easy to crank from lock to lock thanks to the standard SeaStar tilt hydraulic steering. The hull danced across the water with confidence with only a small amount of rpm lost in the tight corners. It handled the bay chop well, pointing to a hull that would be great for fishing large bays and lakes as well as nearshore coastal waters. You could tempt long-distance offshore waters in this boat, but you wouldn’t want to be caught in anything really nasty.

Overall

The 195 CC is a bluewater fisher made for the boater who doesn’t have the capacity for a larger, heavier boat. It’s lightweight, so it’s easier to trailer and kinder in terms of fuel cost, and it’s small enough to fit in most garages.

The Roplene construction of the 195 sets it apart from fiberglass boats and brings some nifty advantages that anglers will appreciate, especially those who are hard on their boats.

Its smaller size, however, doesn’t remotely mean the 195 is small on fishability. It comes with a laundry list of standard and optional fishing features that will set any angler’s mouth to drool.

Editor’s note: To subscribe to Go Boating magazine, visit Go Boating online.

Manufacturer Contact Information

Triumph Boats Inc.
100 Golden Drive
Durham, NC 27705
(800) 564-4225
www.triumphboats.com


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